I’ll Take a Zup

After having resisted the desire to show off my English, I gave in to the temptation when the flight attendant wheeled the drinks cart by.

“What would you like to drink?” she asked.

I looked at the cart briefly, clueless, but I thought I saw one I could pronounce. “I would like a Zup, please.”

She tilted her head, and asked with a frown, “Excuse me?”

“I would like a … Zup,” I repeated louder this time, emphasizing my pronunciation.

She shook her head, puzzled, “I’m sorry.”

I pointed to the cluster of green cans.

“Oh, yes! You would like a 7Up,” she said, hiding a smile.

I felt myself turn purple from the humiliation. She handed me a can. “Thank you,” I managed.

“You are welcome.”

I knew there would be many more such embarrassing moments on an arduous road paved with enigmatic English spellings and intriguing pronunciations, peculiar expressions and linguistic oddities.

I leaned back and remembered the trips to the Black Sea, sitting behind Tati and wishing he drove faster. If only the pilot flew faster!

To read more visit:

http://authonomy.com/books/39263/no-kiss-good-bye/

or click here.

Advertisements

Return from West Germany

That evening they mesmerized me with more stories about their trip. Kent cigarette packages worked well with border inspectors without our gifts confiscated. Mama’s German lessons paid off so much so that Tati commended her and atoned her for having alleged that she squandered time drinking Turkish coffee.

I was captured in a fairy tale with autobahn thoroughfares and fast cars, stores with shelves overloaded with a myriad of products. Instead of one government-issue of an item, a selection? Instead of hoping to find an item, a choice?

“I couldn’t believe it,” Tati said.

Mama nodded, “I wouldn’t believe it if I hadn’t seen everything with my own eyes.”

On their first trip outside Romania and the Eastern Bloc, twelve hundred miles away, they experienced freedom. They saw and heard, felt and tasted a lifestyle vastly so different that their senses awakened – a people living life without fear, in comfort and abundance.

As I listened, I wished to see this world with my own eyes.

She continued, “The rumors are nothing. The differences are incomprehensible. Our lives are so repressed, so far beneath their standard of life. I must admit that Gisi’s and Rudi’s urging us to remain in West Germany was tempting.”

To read more visit:

http://authonomy.com/books/39263/no-kiss-good-bye/

or click here.

Live Free

In my mind rang the hushed words that people in the Occident lived free.

Our government had rendered ordinary citizens entirely dependent, as though undeserving beggars, whose livelihood and well-being hung on the whims of mighty officials who had it made and whose purpose in life was to exercise power to gain more power over people.

Why didn’t the government  let people who wanted to go away to live free go, if that’s what they wanted? If they wanted to leave Romania to live elsewhere, why shoot them or torture them instead of letting them leave to the Free West – especially since officials shouted how bad the western world is?

And I didn’t know about the God the government declared didn’t exist, but I felt in my heart there had to be much more to life than the ticking of the clock.

To read more visit:

http://authonomy.com/books/39263/no-kiss-good-bye/

or click here.

People Have Rights

Excerpt from Chapter 5

Stories about citizens risking death to escape communism circulated widely, said to have run west over heavily guarded fields lined with barbed wire and armed border guards or jumped into the frigid water of the Danube. Many died. Those captured were beaten, tortured, and imprisoned indefinitely. Others drowned in the unforgiving waters of the Danube or shot. Every one had aimed to reach the Free West, a world where it was rumored that “oamenii au drepturi.

I wondered what “people have rights” meant.

I had begun to understand that the communists ran our lives. The government controlled food stores, clothing stores, shoe stores; it controlled what the media reported, how much information and how the information was presented; it decided when two television channels aired and what programs would be broadcasted; it controlled the medical field, hospitals, and the quantity and quality of health care; it decided how much each profession earned; it controlled education and how many openings at each higher education institution; it required every second grade elementary student to join the communist party as a Pioneer; it instituted state atheism and declared it illegal to possess a Bible or Christian literature or to confess faith in God, the consequences of a violation being imprisonment, torture, and personal ruin.

If you liked this excerpt and want to read more visit:

http://authonomy.com/books/39263/no-kiss-good-bye/

or click here.

Hit follow up above, or enter your email address (to the right) for updates! Also hit the like button to the right to like No Kiss Good-bye on Facebook!

Don’t forget to leave any thoughts you have below!

Destiny

“He stood motionless, unsmiling, as the train picked up speed and the distance between us grew. The second I lost sight of him an intense loneliness crushed me. I had set out on an irreversible course towards my destiny.”

To read more visit:

http://authonomy.com/books/39263/no-kiss-good-bye/

or click here.